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A NOSSA FORMA DE VIDA


A nossa forma de vida, DQ winner in Coimbra 2012
(The Way We Are)
by Pedro Filipe Marques, documentary 91 min.
cinematography and sound:Pedro Filipe Marques
sound editing and mixing...Elsa Ferreira
Film editing...Tomás Baltazar, Pedro Filipe Marques
fexecutive producer...Inês Gonçalves
Sales: NO LAND FILMS, pedro.marx@netcabo.pt . ines.noland@gmail.com

In order to make an intimate human portrait of what is left of the soul of Portugal in the present days, I had to lock myself in my grandparents house and think of them as fictional and anthropological characters. During almost four years, each time I walked through the door, first I was family, then I was a director waiting to be a ghost. Willing to achieve cinematically the experience of watching the world from their eyes, I had to create the bubble of their existence in an apartment, eight floors above water, surrounded by the exterior mass media world that daily invades their 60 years-old marriage, but never tears it apart. Although that they seem to be locked inside, their concerns about the world are restless and healthy. The film is built like a microcosm, separated from the outside by windows in which I combined the reflections of the interior scenes. To keep in the film the humour and love about a world they still have to survive to, I created a film with melodramatic consequences, for humour and patience were the weapons I found in them and wanted to prevail of this possibly way of life in extinction.
Pedro Filipe Marques

Up in the air, the 8th floor of a blue tower. The sixty-year-old marriage of Armando, the eternal worker, and the housewife Maria’s consumerism survives. They share their visions like partners in crime turning daily life into a brief comedy with a running commentary upon what an economic decaying country still has to offer them. And all of that, they give it back to us, like a laughing mirror of ourselves.

The “screens” from where they extract the images, flood all around the place; be it TV sets, newspapers, radios or windows overlooking where the Atlantic begins and the river Douro ends. But while the clock seems to stop, there are pagan poems, teeth dreaming, housewives’ strikes, a music box that plays “The Internationale” and a grandson behind the lens, to intimately make us look closer to the way we are.